THE TRIBES AND THE STATES

W. J. Sidis

 Unpublished manuscript, 620 pages, by John W. Shattuck (pseud.), ca.1935

  1982  by Wampanoag Nation 

                            TABLE OF CONTENTS
                              Click or doubleclick chapter #s.

 
INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I RED RACE PRE-HISTORY
1 Source of the Red Race
2 The Cro-Magnons
3 Atlantis
CHAPTER II THE RED MAN IN AMERICA
4 The Different Red Stocks
5 Tribe, Phratry, and Gens
6 Equality and Democracy
7 War and Peace
8 The Penacook Peoples
CHAPTER III PRE-FEDERATE EVENTS
9 Events in the Interior
10 Pre-Federate Transatlantic Communication
11 The Iroquois
12 Lines of Communication
CHAPTER IV THE IROQUOIS FEDERATION
13 Dagonoweda's Plan
14 Formation of the Federation
15 Iroquois Empire and Counter-Federation
16 Federation as a New Departure
CHAPTER V THE GREAT WHITE INVASION
17 An Invading Race
18 Rights of Conquest and Discovery
19 French Invasion
20 British Invasions
21 White Administrations
CHAPTER VI THE PENACOOK FEDERATION
22 The Pilgrims
23 Samoset's Welcome
24 The Iroquois Attack
25 Passaconaway
26 The Penacook Federation
27 Federability of the Penacook Federation
28 Defeat of the Iroquois
CHAPTER VII PISCATAQUA AND MASADCHU
29 Invasion of the Piscataqua
30 The Paumonok Islands
31 Growth of the Pilgrim Colony
32 The Puritan Invasion
33 The Puritans and their Neighbors
34 The Head of Massachusetts Bay
35 The Iroquois Alliance
CHAPTER VIII THE PENACOOK PEACE
36 The Peace of 1634
37 Elsewhere in America
38 Invasion of the Quinnitucket
39 Extension of the Bay Colony
40 Apostle Eliot
41 Narragansett Bay Settlements
CHAPTER IX THE LAST OF THE PEQUOTS
39 Federation on the Quinnitucket
40 The Pequot War
41 Puritan Re-Migration
42 Puritan Revolt in England
43 New Haven
CHAPTER X THE NEW ENGLAND CONFEDERATION
44 Difficulties with the Dutch
45 New England Federation
46 Annexation of the Piscataqua
47 New Sects
48 Conquest of the South
49 The Middle Regions
CHAPTER XI UNDER RESTORED MONARCHY
50 American Policy of the Restored Stuarts
51 The Penacook Country at the Restoration
52 The Duke of York's Claims
53 New Settlement in Carolina
54 Punishing New England
55 New York's Border Conflicts
CHAPTER XII METACOM'S WAR
56 Bashaba Metacom
57 Plymouth Resents Metacom
58 Reconquest of Paumonok
59 Effect of the Penacook Federation
60 War Against Plymouth
61 Converts and Adoptees
62 The Defeat of the Tribes
63 Rebellion in Virginia
CHAPTER XIII QUAKER SETTLEMENT
64 The Keystone Colony
65 Starting the Quaker Colony
66 Massachusetts's Charter Disputes
67 Extension of the Keystone Territory
CHAPTER XIV THE ANDROS REGIME
68 New York's Overlord Becomes King
69 New York Annexes New England
70 Witchcraft
71 Rebellion Against Andros
72 The Rebellion Spreads
CHAPTER XV REBEL PROVINCES
73 Rebel Provinces
74 Father Rasles
75 The Hudson Valley Is Attacked
76 The Rebel Governments
77 Scalping Bounties
78 Down the Mississippi
79 End of the Rebel Governments
CHAPTER XVI INTERCOLONIAL STRUGGLES
80 The Peace of 1697
81 Louisiana
82 The English Colonies after the Partition
83 The Acadian War
84 Wars Against the Tribes
85 A Thirteenth Colony
86 Religious Reform
87 The Georgian War
CHAPTER XVII THE GREAT OHIO WAR
88 Canessetago and Franklin
89 Expulsion of the Acadians
90 The Lanapes' New Home
91 French Expansion in the Interior
92 Virginia's Ohio Expedition
93 The Great Ohio War Starts
94 Iroquois Territory Invaded
95 Amherst's Smallpox
96 Capture of Canada
97 The Peace of 1763
CHAPTER XVIII AFTERMATH OF THE GREAT OHIO WAR
98 Royal Peace Proclamation
99 The Ottawa Federation
100 Spanish Exploration
101 The New Regime in Canada
102 Manufacturing in England and America
103 New Titles in New England
104 Collecting for the War
CHAPTER XIX DEFIANCE
104b* The Stamp Act Congress
105 Boston is Invaded
106 The South Defies the Proclamation
107 The Virginia Liberals
108 The Quebec Act
109 Other Complaints
110 Smugglers' Resistance
111 Correspondence Committees
112 The Boston Port Bill
CHAPTER XX THE PERIOD OF CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
113 A New Military Regime Enters Massachusetts
114 Congress of the United Colonies
115 The Provincial Congress in Massachusetts
116 Aid from New Hampshire
117 The Winter of 1774 in Boston
118 New York Attempts to Oust the Vermonters
119 The British Raid Middlesex
120 The Pursuit
CHAPTER XXI THE SIEGE OF BOSTON
121 The Siege Begins
122 The Capture of Ticonderoga
123 The Mecklenburg Declarations
124 Revolt in Maine
125 The Continental Congress of 1775
126 The Attack on Charlestown
127 Washington Takes Command
128 Attack on Canada
129 Evacuation of Boston
CHAPTER XXII DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
130 The Continental Army Moves to New York
131 Independence in Rhode Island
132 Independence Discussed by the Continental Congress
133 The Declaration of Independence
134 The Accusations in the Declaration
135 Federal Structure of the First Republic
CHAPTER XXIII THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE
136 Proclaiming Independence
137 England Recovers New York
138 "Burgoyning"
139 Foreign Aid
140 The Articles of Confederation
141 The War in the West
142 The "Commonwealth"
143 The War in the South
CHAPTER XXIV THE FIRST REPUBLIC
144 Peace Negotiations
145 Evacuation of New York
146 Post-Revolution Migrations
147 The Green Mountain War
148 The Northwest Territory
CHAPTER XXV ECONOMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF THE FIRST REPUBLIC
149 Conflict of Economic Systems
150 Currency under the First Republic
151 Church Reorganization
152 Land and Trade under the First Republic
153 The Soldiers' Demands
CHAPTER XXVI THE SHAYS REBELLION
154 The Rhode Island Coup
155 The Hatfield Convention
156 The Northampton Insurrection
157 Spread of the Shays Rebellion
158 Defeat of the Rebellion
159 Refugees and Prisoners
CHAPTER XXVII THE CINCINNATI CONSPIRACY
160 The Annapolis Convention
161 Aftermath of the Shays Rebellion
162 The Northwest Ordinance
163 The Secret Meeting at Philadelphia
164 The Plan for the Overthrow
165 The Ratifying Conventions
166 The Massachusetts Reservations
167 The First Republic Surrenders
CHAPTER XXVIII WASHINGTON'S ADMINISTRATION
168 The Second Republic is Started
169 Opposition to the Second Republic
170 The Recalcitrant States
171 Northwest and Southwest Territories
172 The Bill of Rights
173 Washington and the Federal District
174 Federalist Regime Economic Activities
175 Foreign Relations
176 Washington Retires
CHAPTER XXIX DOWNFALL OF FEDERALISM
177 American Neutrality
178 Sedition Laws
179 The Dispute with Georgia
180 End of the Federalist Period
CHAPTER XXX UNDER THE DEMOCRATIC- REPUBLICANS
181 Jefferson Becomes President
182 Acquisition of Louisiana
183 The Embargo
184 Tecumseh
185 The Canadian War
186 Dictatorship in Louisiana
187 Fixing the Borders
188 Missouri Becomes a State
189 Renewal of South American Revolutions
 

[The End?]

 

197 Warren Ave.
Boston, Mass
[Sunday,] Aug. 4, 1935


        I have sent you a copy of the first instalment of the Tribe's pamphlet "The Tribes and the States." Not my pamphlet, but the Tribe'scompiled and edited by the Okamakammessets, and issued by the American Independence Society. The charge is 50, but no real hurry.

        I am sorry I have no better news to report so far. Took another Civil Service exam, and was informed that I passed the state clerical exam, and I am No. 254not so encouraging.

        The Independence Society is getting together a new onea collection  of poems  of American Liberty.  I heard also last week that the "Tribe" is planning to get out its history in a new forma monthly issue, each time to be dated some past date and describing the history of that time as current news.

        Sorry things are going worse over in N.Y.  Better luck for next time!

                                                   W. J. Sidis

 

197 Warren Ave.
Boston, Mass
[Wednesday,] Aug. 14, 1935


        I have got hold of three more copies of "The Tribes and the States," and sent them to you, as you ordered. I do wish it to be understood that, as the pamphlet states in the introduction, it is not to be considered to be the work of any individual, but of an organisation. I may have helped on it, but I certainly do not want to be considered the author, as there are lots of things there I would not care to take personal responsibility for; so please do not represent the pamphlet to anyone as my work.

        That tribal organisation  just surprised me by sending―from some place in New Hampshire I never heard of before, an historical newspaper written in American, and which seemed to be good and exciting stuff. Hope they can keep it up.

                                                           Yours truly,

                                                                       W. J. Sidis