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Notes on the Collection of Transfers

W. J. Sidis


Philadelphia, Dorrance and Company [©1926]
xi, [1], 13-306 p. illus. (incl. maps) diagrs. 20 cm.

 

"Author recommends that the Reader, after going through this Introduction, skip and read the end of the book first, and gradually work back toward the beginning as references and contexts suggest."

 

 TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

Click chapters to open.

PART I

THE RIGHT OF TRANSFER

CHAPTER I

TRANSFERS IN GENERAL

1 What Is Included
2 Vehicles Giving Transfers

CHAPTER II

TRANSFER PRIVILEGES

3 Transfer Privileges in General
4 The Universal Transfer Privilege
5 The Special Transfer Privilege
6 The Restricted Transfer Privilege
7 Central Districts
8 Continuation Privileges

CHAPTER III

FARES

9 Prepayment Stations
10 Payment of Fares
11 Notation for Fare Rates

CHAPTER IV

REVERSIBILITY

12 Reversibility of Fares
13 Reversibility of Transfers
14 Reversibility as an Aid in Collection

CHAPTER V

FARE LIMITS AND OVERLAPS

15 Fare Limits
16 Overlap Receipts as Transfers
17 Effect of Overlap on Transfer Privileges
18 The Overlap Transfer Privilege

CHAPTER VI

CIRCUMSTANCES OF ISSUE

19 Issuance of Transfers
20 Passenger Using Transfer
21 Fares Paid for Transfer
22 Repeat Transfers
23 Reversibility of Repeats

CHAPTER VII

SYSTEMS AND SUB-SYSTEMS

24 Companies and Systems
25 Notation for Systems
26 Sub-Systems
27 Inter-Company Transfers

PART II

CONTENTS OF TRANSFERS

CHAPTER VIII

TRANSFER TICKETS

28 General Appearance of Tickets
29 Transfer Inscriptions
30 Transfer Conditions
31 Endorsed Matter

CHAPTER IX

TRANSFER FORMS

32 What Constitutes Separate Forms
33 Issues of Transfers
34 Vestigial Forms
35 Punches and Listings
36 Types and Devices

CHAPTER X

DATING OF TRANSFERS

37 What Constitutes Dating
38 The Date-Number Surcharge
39 Month Surcharge
40 Surcharge of Complete Date
41 Date-Code Surcharge
42 Color Check on dating
43 Jumbled Dating
44 Undated Forms

CHAPTER XI

TRANSFER TIME LIMITS

45 Elements of a Time Limit
46 Old Type Time Limits
47 Slight Variations of Old-Type Time Limits
48 Owl Time Limits
49 Dial Time Limits
50 Stamped Time Limits
51 Attached Coupons as Indicating Time Limits
52 Absence of Time Limit
53 Effect of Time Limit

CHAPTER XII

THE HALF-DAY ON TRANSFERS

54 Combination of Half-Day With Time Limit
55 Separate Punch for the Half-Day
56 Combination of Half-Day With Other Items
57 A.M. and P.M. Surcharges
58 Separate Half-Day Forms
59 Indication of Half-Day by Attached Coupons
60 Distinction Between A.M. and P.M.

CHAPTER XIII

ROUTES

61 Difference of Routes
62 Naming of Routes
63 Company Numbering and Lettering of Routes
64 Naming of Directions
65 Naming and Numbering of Divisions
66 Number of Lines in Cities
67 Notation for Routes and Divisions

CHAPTER XIV

TRANSFER ISSUING UNITS

68 What Constitutes a Transfer- Issuing Unit
69 What may Be Transfer-Issuing Units
70 Indication of Transfer-Issuing Unit
71 Wording of Issuing Unit on Transfers
72 Baltimore Type of Transfer
73 Section of the Issuing Unit
74 Attached Coupons Indicating Initial Fare Limit
75 Transfer-Receiving Units
76 Notation for Transfer-Issuing Unit

CHAPTER XV

CONDITIONS OF PLACE

77 Varieties of Conditions of Place
78 Implication of Receiving Conditions
79 Wording of Receiving Conditions
80 Punching and Listing of Conditions of Acceptance
81 Additions and Exceptions
82 Explanation of Punches
83 Other Endorsed Conditions
84 Parallel Columns
85 Combination of Receiving Conditions With Other Conditions
86 Direction Punches
87 The Square-Box Type

CHAPTER XVI

MISCELLANEOUS CONDITIONS

88 Indication of Repeats
89 Use of Original Transfer for repeat
90 Emergency and Continuation Indications
91 Forms Not Giving Actual Transferral
92 Classes of Transfers
93 Form Numbers
94 Serial Numbers
95 Conductor's Numbers and Run Numbers
96 Issuing and Receiving Punches

CHAPTER XVII

STANDARD TYPES

97 The Ham Type
98 The Pope Types
99 The Smith Type
100 The Moran Type
101 The Franklin Rapid Transfer
102 Stedman transfers

CHAPTER XVIII

COLORING OF TRANSFERS

103 Color Schedules
104 Individual Coloring
105 Uniform Coloring
106 Variable Color Schedules
107 Coloring Based on Class of Transfer
108 Coloring Based on Half-Day
109 Coloring Based on Issuing Direction
110 Combination of Different Kinds of Schedules

PART III

COLLECTING TRANSFERS

CHAPTER XIX

COLLECTION IN GENERAL

111 Direct Collection
112 Separate Forms
113 Tickets and Receipts
114 New Issues
115 Incomplete Transfers

CHAPTER XX

DERELICT TRANSFERS

116 What Is a Derelict
117 Separate Forms
118 Handling Derelicts
119 Cleaning and Patching Derelicts
120 Importance of Derelict Transfers in Collection
121 Souvenir Transfers

CHAPTER XXI

LOCAL EXPLORATION

122 Local Trolley and Bus Riding
123 Suburban and Interurban Riding
124 City Exits
125 Other Modes of Travel
126 Points to be Noticed by the Collector

CHAPTER XXII

ARRANGEMENT OF COLLECTION

127 Grouping of Transfer Forms
128 Transfer Envelopes
129 Labelling the Envelopes
130 Filling Envelopes
131 Division of Envelopes
132 Duplicate Collections
133 Keeping Count of a Collection

CHAPTER XXIII

INDEXING THE COLLECTION

134 File Numbers for Transfers
135 Record of File Code
136 Order of Filing Transfers
137 General Index
138 Index of Hints
139 Index of Duplicates
140 "Bad Condition" Index
141 Summary of Transfer Indexing
142 Special Type Index

CHAPTER XXIV

READING TRANSFERS

143 Interest in Reading transfers
144 Transfers as Auxiliary Street Guides
145 Company Connections
146 Noticeable Factors in Reading Transfers
147 Tracing Form Resemblances

CHAPTER XXV

MAPS AND GUIDES

148 Use of Local Maps and Guide Books
149 Transfer Maps of Systems
150 Distribution Maps
151 Census Guides
152 Information Leaflets and Time Schedules

CHAPTER XXVI

TRANSFER HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES

153 Transfer Hunting from Various Cities
154 Opportunities for Collection from New York
155 Opportunities for Collection from Cleveland
156 Opportunities for Collection from Los Angeles
157 Transfer Collecting While Travelling

CHAPTER XXVII

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS OF INTEREST

158 General Interest in Transfer Collection
159 Historical Interest
160 Anecdotes and Verse
161 Conclusion
 

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A

 
APPENDIX B  
APPENDIX C  
APPENDIX D  
APPENDIX E  
APPENDIX F  
APPENDIX G [DESIGN FOR TRANSFER ENVELOPE]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC Control Number: 26008226
Type of Material: Book (Print, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Brief Description: [Sidis, William James], 1898- [from old catalog]
Notes on the collection of transfers.
Philadelphia, Dorrance and company [c1926]
xi, [1], 13-306 p. illus. (incl. maps) diagrs. 20 cm.

CALL NUMBER: HE4347 .S5
Copy 1
-- Request in: Jefferson or Adams Bldg General or Area Studies Reading Rms
-- Status: Not Charged

 

 

 

YOUTHFUL PRODIGIES AT GENIUS MEETING

"Mother" Stoners' League Holds First Patrons' Gathering at Bird Home in Tuckahoe.

CHILD AUTHOR AS HOSTESS

Caroline Bird, 9, Entertains Other Famous Youngsters―Transfer Collector Speaks.
________________

Special to the New York Times.

    TUCKAHOE, N. Y., June 19.―The first of a series of Genius-Patron MÍtes, under the auspices of the League for Fostering Genius, was held this afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hobart S. Bird, the hostess of the afternoon being Carolina Bird, the nine-year-old author and orator.

    Winifred Sackville Stoner, who is called "Mother" Stoner by her friends and who is the founder of the league, explained the object of the gathering, which is to emulate the ancient Grecian custom of bringing wealthy people and aspiring young geniuses together.

    Frank Folupa of Boston, who has made a hobby of the collection of street car transfers and has gone into the history of the various types and kinds and uses of transfers, was a speaker.

    Among the youthful prodigies introduced this afternoon were Paul Gest, ten-year-old nephew of Morris Gest, who came from Russia a year ago and has written several children's plays; Elizabeth Benson, the twelve-year-old daughter of Anne Austin, the writer, who is ready to enter college; Bobbie Kanovlas, three-year-old son of Dr. John Kanovlas of Brooklyn, who demonstrated his knowledge of music by giving the history and principal themes of a number of operas and who has composed music.

   Others were June, 6 years old, and Dorothea, 9, daughters of Schuyler Patterson, the author, who have shown literary talent; Emma Lord, composer of children's music; David Farjeon, ten-year-old composer and pianist; Elizabeth Rollent, eleven-year-old dancer; Elizabeth Willguss and Jean Wilson, two twelve-year-old authors.

    Among the older people present today were Claribel Fontaine, actress, and Gertrude Boyle, the sculptress; Orcella Rexford, who spoke upon her research work in the use of colors to express personality and to bring out the latent personality of people who consult her.

    "Mother" Stoner expressed her satisfaction at the success of the gathering and said that she hoped that other philanthropically inclined persons would become interested in the work of the league, of which Dr. Frank Snow is President.

    "Surely there is no better way in which to spend one's millions," she said in her talk, "than in helping the divine spark to glow and to bring happiness to the world. It is a disgrace to humanity that any genius has been allowed to suffer for the necessities of life."

Sunday, June 20, 1926, p. 8.
Copyright © The New York Times

Contributed by Stephen Bates

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